Menopause, Menopause Symptoms, Mood, Perimenopause, PMS

Whirligig Menopause

Mr.  Whirligig stands on my porch.  

You never know when the wind will set his arms spinning.

And that’s how I’ve found it to be with menopause. 

You never know when a symptom (a new one or an old one) is going to start up.  Grumpiness.  Hot flashes.  Night sweats.  Insomnia.  Water retention.  Nervousness.  Dryness of one sort or another.  A period arriving six months after you figured you were done.

The wind’s direction determines which way Mr. Whirligig’s arms will twirl.  They can go one way or the other.

Is that the best way to handle the mercurial winds of menopause?  Twirl the way they send you?  Perhaps.  They seem to be the boss, anyway.  

I’m surprised sometimes, when Mr. Whirligig’s arms start  to turn.  A slight touch of wind, from nowhere in particular, will get a reaction.

It’s the same way with menopause.  Just when this girl is feeling calm, just when I think I’m finished, the symptoms swirl on back.

Drats and drats and DRATS!

 Poet Christina Rossetti writes:

            Who has seen the wind?

            Neither I nor you:

            But when the leaves hang trembling,

            The wind is passing through.

I would love to SEE a hormone.  What do these little buggers that cause me so much trouble look like!  (I’m not ditzing, really, on hormones.  I know they fill a biological purpose far beyond my understanding.)

But I want to lay eyes on one.  Actually,what I’d really like to do is have a conversation with one.

But I can’t.  And I can’t see the wind.   Neither can Mr. Whirligig.

All in all, he seems pretty content.  And he reminds me that when it comes to The Great Pause, there ain’t no telling just how that wind is gonna blow from day to day.

How about you?  Have the winds of PMS/Perimenopause/Menopause knocked you flat?  Or have you been able to twirl in the hormonal winds with the grace of a whirligig?

Photo:  Mr. Whirligig, who probably needs a more creative name, was handmade by someone whose name I will never know.  He was a gift from my mom.

Whirligigs:   Wikipedia has a fun article on whirligigs.  To see a festive variety of whirligigs on sale today, check out the website of Hand Crafted Creations. And take a few minutes to watch this video from the Whirligig and Weathervane Festival in Shelburne, Nova Scotia.   Whirls and twirls!   Amazing!

17 thoughts on “Whirligig Menopause”

    1. Barbara,
      You seem to be fixated on Menopause. Perhaps you need to consider writing a novel about a girl getting her first period, or waiting for it, while her mother is losing hers.
      i did enjoy your Mr. whirligig. I have a pink flamingo that makes the most wonderful creaking metal noises as he watches over my writing. Good post.
      JOY

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      1. Joy, Not exactly fixated–it is a menopause blog! Good idea for the novel. Mr. Whirligig would probably get a kick out of meeting your pink flamingo. Maybe they can wave to each other across the miles.

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  1. Now you are going to laugh. I have had regular periods ( and I mean on the due date) since I started my first period at 12 years of age. When I was 44 ( I am 47 now) my period was late: one day, two days, three days.. one week: I got very nervous.. So I bought two pregnancy tests.. and did them both.. I really thought I was pregnant.
    Well I wasn’t !! (my son turns 25 next month and my daughter is 23) so I was relieved, but I also wondered: is this perimenopause? and the answer is YES IT IS.. I have been on a ride every since. Lately I think of is as a wave and I just ride along. Nothing is certain and everything goes.!! THAT IS FOR SURE.. This is a crazy time, but I am embracing it and filled with awe that this hormone can do such bizarre things to my body.

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    1. Great attitude. All the hormones are jumping with joy that you are giving them such homage. (And you’re right–they are amazing and so tiny!) Love the idea of a wave. Hmm, think we’re ready to take up surfing?

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  2. You got me to thinking, I wanted to see a hormone, too. So I googled “photo hormone.” The computer models of the chemical structures make me think of strands of confetti. So now I think of those little plastic bottles that you pull the string and POP, pink and purple strands shoot out all over the place. Hormones having a party in my body, that’s what menopause is all about. Well, maybe more like “the morning after.”

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    1. Ha! Makes me think of “Flow Gently Sweet Afton.” That would be a fun name for someone’s period–Afton. Then you could sing the song to it. Any takers?

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    1. Mr. Whirligig was glad to go to church to meet the children, but he doesn’t know he’s on a menopause blog. He’s old school. Not sure he would be that pleased.

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  3. reminds me of rudie. i bet rudie has some wisdom to share when it comes to the pause and hormones and life. we should see him soon right?

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  4. I’m 46 and must be on the ride. In the past few years, Afton has had longer stays than usual. He’s resumed coming and going in less than a weeks time. All this while I’m on bcp.

    The thing that upsets me most is my jawline and insomnia, to name the biggest offenders.I can live with my disappearing jawline if I could only sleep like a log each night!

    Hormones are not our friend at this time! This clip from My Big Fat Greek Wedding comes to mind. When menopause started the lump in the back of her neck started to grow…due to the “hormonees”. LOL! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWispEM3900

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    1. I’d forgotten that scene!

      I do a lot of that: “I could stand this symptom, if I didn’t have that symptom.” Gosh, I wish we could pick. I’ve had a terrible time with the sleeping–going to do a post on it before long. I wish I had some great advice. Good news is I’ve started to sleep better. I’ll send the Sleep Fairy (Oh I had forgotten it’s a he–The Sandman) in your direction!

      Thanks for reading and for your fun comment.

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