Monthly Archives: May 2014

Women and Running: From Turkey Day Trots to 100-Mile Runs

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Kirsten Casey headshot-post 100-mile run

 A post by writer and anthologist June Cotner:

Recently my 34-year-old daughter, Kirsten Casey (above and below), took first place among females in the 100-mile Lumberjack Endurance Run in Port Gamble, Washington, finishing the race in a little over 24 hours.

Kirsten Casey finishing 100-mile run

Though I’m a former runner with a half marathon to my credit, it’s hard for me to imagine starting a race at 8 am on a Saturday and not finishing until a full day later.

As I drifted off into a fitful sleep that Saturday night, I couldn’t help but think my daughter is still running.

Three decades earlier in 1973 I was denied entry to the traditional Five Mile Road Race (known as the “Turkey Day Trot”) in Manchester, Connecticut, because … I was a woman. The reason: “Women would just screw up the mens’ times,” the race director told me.

Prior to moving to Connecticut, I had competed in many road races in California, including the storied 7.45 mile Bay to Breakers (San Francisco) and the grueling 7.4 mile Dipsea Race (from Mill Valley, CA to Stinson Beach).

What seemed like a routine procedure, completing an entry form, turned into a frustrating ordeal. I had called the race director in advance to make sure he would be available because I was driving 1.5 hours round trip to pick up the entry form.

When I arrived he told me that the race was closed to women and he had assumed I had driven that distance to pick up the form for my husband. He informed me that the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU)-sanctioned race had been all male for 37 years.

I immediately got in touch with the media and contacted all high schools and colleges in the greater Hartford area.

Woman Left Behind clip

I created running bibs, “EQUAL RIGHTS FOR ROAD RUNNERS,” and we had a great turnout!

Equal Rights for Road Runners SIGN

Prior to the race, the story was carried on television, radio, and the front page of The Hartford Courant. That’s me in the pigtails.

Equal rights newspaper article

After the race, the story went nationwide via Associated Press.

Associated Press clip

The following year … women were “legally” allowed to enter!

Who would have thought that something as simple as the desire to run a five-mile race could spark such controversy and end in a decision that would help my daughter to run a 100-mile race thirty years later?

Whether it’s running five miles, 100 miles, or running for political office, we all face obstacles in our lives.

When we take a stand and confront these challenges, we are given the opportunity not only to overcome them, but also to set the path for future generations.

june-cotner

June Cotner is the author of more than two dozen books. SOAR! Follow Your Dreams was published in March by Andrews McMeel Publishing and Garden Blessings was published in May by Viva Editions.

Follow June on Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter. Check out her website at   www.JuneCotner.com and her author page on Amazon.com.

The Hormone Health Network

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A post by Cheretta Clerkley of the Hormone Health Network:

Patients have questions. We have answers. 

The Hormone Health Network is committed to helping patients have more informed discussions with their health care providers about hormone health, disease, and treatment. Our educational resources are based on the clinical and scientific expertise of the Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists, representing more than 17,000 physicians and scientists.

We know it can be difficult to find resources that help patients understand their conditions and treatment options. Our goal is to positively impact the health and well-being of all individuals by moving them from educated to engaged.

All of our resources are free and accessible on our site including:

  • Fact Sheets –Our flagship series features more than 80 titles in both English and Spanish, covering the broad range of endocrine therapeutic areas including menopause, women’s reproductive health, weight management, osteoporosis, and much more.
  • What Do Hormones Do? –Individuals with hormone-related disorder may know what hormones are relevant to their condition, but not how they work this publication series addresses these knowledge gaps.
  • Myth vs. FactMany people turn to the internet for health information, but can’t always tell what is accurate this series dispels misconceptions related to hormones, health, and disease by providing clinical and scientific information.
  • Infographics New!-Our newest series, offer powerful digital tools that include general information about hormone health, disease, and treatment.
  • Find an Endocrinologist-The Hormone Health Network’s physician referral directory is comprised of over 3,000 members of The Endocrine Society, the largest and most influential organization of endocrinologists in the world. The referral is updated weekly with physicians who are accepting new patients.

 On the Horizon 

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This summer, the Network, in collaboration with the Red Hot Mamas patient advocacy group, will be launching a new interactive online tool for women focusing on menopause. Please be sure to visit hormone.org in June to experience first-hand this customized new product.

 Talking with Your Doctor 

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It’s important when communicating to your doctor that you feel empowered to have an educated and informed discussion so that you may convey your symptoms and more importantly; ask questions about your health.

Learn more about the Shared Decision Making process and how you can be an active partner in your healthcare.

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Cheretta A. Clerkley is a strategic marketing health care professional for Hormone Health Network. She has worked for over 10 years in direct patient education focusing on hormone health.  For more information connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

A Shadow of My Former Self

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Shadow

Menopause messes with your mind…

Whirls and twirls those old brain waves

And shoots out changes in attitude, perspective, and personality.

Some changes just happen.

Some are more deliberate, prompted by an increase in zest, courage, and confidence.

A week ago, my friend Judy Brown sent me this quotation about conscious changes:

“Every time you are tempted to react in the same old way, ask if you want
to be a prisoner of the past or a pioneer of the future.”

– Deepak Chopra

As a younger woman, I might not have gotten this.

I thought you had to react in the old ways.

If someone makes you mad, yell. If someone hurts your feelings, cry. If someone refuses to cooperate, sulk.

But I tried Deepak’s advice this week.

It works!

Keeping it up will be the challenge.

But this leopard is willing to change her spots.

I want to live as a taller, more reflective and loving shadow of my former self.

What about you?

Any techniques for tossing past ways of handling life and embracing new ones?

For another post on menopausal change, visit the smiling, flying leopard on this post.

Leopard

I took this shadow selfie on the beach at Bald Head Island last October.

A Jumble of Jewelry (and a Giveaway!)

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Jewelry

 

There’s something in those menopausal hormones that whispers (or shouts): “Get organized.”

I’ve heard it from lots of women. The need to pare down. To put in order. To simplify.

Which brings me to the issue of my jumble of jewelry.

Are you in the same boat?

Years of necklaces, earrings, rings, watches, bracelets, and pins. Some valuable. Some costume. Some dainty. Some chunky and arty.

And all in a jumble.

Necklaces are a pain because they tangle.

Earrings because they clump together and often lose their partners.

Rings because they’re tiny and easily disappear (and are often the most treasured, creating panic when they go missing).

Watches, pins, and bracelets aren’t so bad, but storage isn’t easy for any of them.

And so, on my summer task list: Tackle my jumble of jewelry.

Tips?

As I dig into this project, some of my rings will go on the kitty ring holder  you see below, a gift from Umbra. Umbra’s goal is to bring innovative new products to the market in response to the ways people are living today. They emphasize design, function, and fun. Take a minute and watch the video!

Giveaway: Umbra is offering ring holders to five lucky Friend for the Ride readers. To enter, please leave a comment by June 15. (I can’t promise if you’ll win a kitty, a bunny, or a giraffe. ) Thanks, Umbra!

 

kitty

Giraffe

Bunny

 

Umbra features lots of other ring holders. The Eiffel Tower would make me feel like I was back in Paris.

And for storing other jewelry, I especially like the Tuck Storage Box and the Canopy Jewelry Stand

Check out Umbra’s other cool storage items on their website.