My Cancer Story: Oncology Check

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As an endometrial cancer survivor, I visit the oncologist once a year and six months later, the gynecologist. Although I wouldn’t dare skip one of these appointments, I do feel some apprehension before and during each check up.

I’m happy to step into UNC Hospital again though. The doctors and staff saved my life, and I’m grateful beyond measure. The hospital is nicely designed and decorated, and the food is good. My memories are joyful ones, especially the moment when I got the first pathology report.

Before my latest appointment a few weeks ago, I studied the brush strokes on this painting in the waiting room. Now that I’m taking an art class, I keep my eyes open for art education opportunities.

On to the check up.

The news was excellent: No sign of recurrence. I asked my doctor a round of questions because I like to get my money’s worth. (A visit to UNC Hospital is not cheap.) Then Cliff and I went for a celebratory lunch.

Since my news is happy news, let’s move to a more carefree topic. When you go to the doctor, and the nurse tells you to undress, do you climb on the table once you have on the drape or robe? Or do you wait in the chair?

In my younger days, I felt duty bound to climb on the table.  But that old table can be hard on the back while you wait. And wait. And wait.

So now I don’t get on the table until the doctor comes into the room.  I snapped this selfie to show you. (I’m glad the doc didn’t catch me taking it. None of my doctors has expressed any interest in my menopause blog. Why not? Who knows? A question for another day…)

Back to the question at hand. Table or chair?

Do tell!

To read more about endometrial cancer and my experience, check out the link at the top of the page or click here.  Endometrial cancer has a high cure rate, if caught early, and is the most common cancer of the female reproductive system. 

15 responses »

  1. It depends on whether they give me a gown or a drape. My “annual” visits usually involve a drape and I do not want to sit my bare tush on a communal chair. So I climb on the table and cover my lower half with the drape, and if they take too long I put the foot rest out and lie down.

    It’s tricky trying to guess which angle the door will open from and preserve the naked behind being the first thing they see as they walk in, as well. I’m not terribly shy (HAH!) but I try to be thoughtful. (TRY.)

  2. Chair. Always chair until the doctor says, table. The only time I go on the table anymore is if I’m really tired or weak and need to lie down. Otherwise, I want to meet the dr. more as a human being equal.

  3. I still hop up on the table as I can’t ever figure out how to tie those crazy gowns. And they are so huge on me anyway. So I get settled on the table and get the gown settled as much as possible. As awful as these appointments might be, I still prefer it over going to the dentist!!!!

  4. Table – usually they only give me the drape so I feel better to be all settled (and covered) on the table before the doc arrives.
    Glad you had a good check up 🙂

  5. So happy for you Barbara that you received such good news on your check-up for cancer! Very cute “selfie” in the doctor’s examining room! I try to remove only what clothing is necessary, at the latest time possible, and stay comfortably clothed and seated in a chair for as long as possible. The wait times can be so long! Doctors’ long examining tables are not fun to sit on with no back support (especially when we are in our 60’s, not our 20’s)! Happily, when being examined recently for a follow-up, I got to have regular clothes on, and when the doctor did examine me on the table, he told me I didn’t have to stay there, but could take a chair if I liked to talk with him in the chair instead. Yes! As Bob Dylan sang, “The Times They Are A Changin!”

  6. Table. When I go for my quarterly dermatology exam for Melenoma, I have to undress from head to toe, so I sit on the end of the table and wait. I have no desire to move.

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