Menopause

One More Time

I’m hearing that some of you did not receive the corrected post I sent out two hours ago, so let’s try again. Here’s what I sent: 

Whoops. That post went up before it was ready.

I’m sad to say, I’ve lost track of who sent me these wonderful Western doors.

I found this stylish door at a restaurant in Fort Lauderdale.

And this elegant one  at Lago Mar beach Resort, where Cliff and I stayed before we got on our cruise ship in February.

Here’s a door near the pool on the ship.

All the bathrooms had these lovely sinks.

Cliff reported there were fun quotations over the urinals in the men’s room.

This was a sign at an herb farm on Grenada.

This one graces the Hilton there.

And a nice painting inside the ladies room.

Here’s blue ceramic on the door of the rum factory in Grenada. Yum on the rum!Rum

I loved this one at Orchid World in Barbados.

Found this pleasant sign on St. Maarten.

This rustic door can be seen on St. Kitts.


And one more on St. Kitts.

St. Kitts

Once again, my apologies for letting this post go out too soon. A jolt to this blogger on a Sunday morning. Have a greet day, everyone!

Menopause

The Ladies Room Door Art Series: Part Fifty-Let’s Try This One Again

Whoops. That post went up before it was ready.

I’m sad to say, I’ve lost track of who sent me these wonderful Western doors.

I found this stylish door at a restaurant in Fort Lauderdale.

And this elegant one  at Lago Mar beach Resort, where Cliff and I stayed before we got on our cruise ship in February.

Here’s a door near the pool on the ship.

All the bathrooms had these lovely sinks.

Cliff reported there were fun quotations over the urinals in the men’s room.

This was a sign at an herb farm on Grenada.

This one graces the Hilton there.

And a nice painting inside the ladies room.

Here’s blue ceramic on the door of the rum factory in Grenada. Yum on the rum!Rum

I loved this one at Orchid World in Barbados.

Found this pleasant sign on St. Maarten.

This rustic door can be seen on St. Kitts.


And one more on St. Kitts.

St. Kitts

Once again, my apologies for letting this post go out too soon. A jolt to this blogger on a Sunday morning. Have a greet day, everyone!

Menopause

Menopause and Me (and You)

2019-best-blogs-menopause-800x1200-pinterest (1)

 

I’m delighted to be named a Healthline Best Menopause Blog of the Year. Here’s the link to the announcement with descriptions of the winning blogs:  https://www.healthline.com/health/menopause/best-blogs-of-the-year.

I love menopause! Despite it’s challenges, I think its a liberating and creative and transforming time in a woman’s life. But as you may have noticed, I’ve been focusing on menopause less in recent years. I’m now so far out from the Great Pause that I have trouble coming up with fresh material on the subject. I’ve turned to other topics that are pulling at my heart and body and mind.

So those of you who are in the midst of menopause or approaching it, I encourage you to follow the many fine menopause bloggers on the Healthline list. I hope Healthline will continue to include me since there are plenty of menopause posts in the Friend for the Ride archive, and menopause will still be featured from time to time.

Is it okay with you, oh loyal and wise and gentle readers, that I’ve mostly moved on to other topics? Do tell me how you feel. Thanks!

 

2018-badges

Menopause

Special Edition: Ladies Room Doors of China

There’s friendship, and then there’s friendship.

There’s blog loyalty, and then there’s blog loyalty.

Susan is a friend of friends and loyaler than loyal because she snapped bathroom doors for Friend for the Ride throughout her recent trip to China. And wow, did she find some doors! Thank you, Susan.

The sign above and the first one below are from the Beijing railway station.

This is the Art Zone 798 in Beijing.

Here’s a squat potty with an automatic trash can and sluicing water.

I asked Susan to tell us a bit more about the potty situation in China. She writes: “Even in tourist areas, squat potties are the norm. If you are very lucky there will be one western-style toilet. Toilet paper is rarely available; I brought camping t.p. along on the trip and carried it daily. One odd thing is that you placed your used tissue in a trash can in the cubicle; their plumbing isn’t equipped to handle paper!”

A hot pot restaurant in Beijing

A toast tea house in Beijing

A public bathroom in one of the old hutong (alleys) in Beijing

Susan found this door at a  restaurant in Beijing. Her girls are very good with languages, so I suspect they were the translators.

Jingzun Peking duck restaurant

The Beijing Airport

A public restroom in Jing Alley, Chengdu

Susan at a hutong in Chengdu China. Hutong means alley.

And here is our photographer at the Giant Panda Breeding Center located outside Chengdu.

Thank you so much, Susan, for sending such wonderful doors to Friend for the Ride!

Menopause

Giving Back: The Toys Are Escaping!

As time becomes more precious, I find I’m less interested in doing regular volunteer work out of my house. So how to happily give back to a world that’s been good to me and where there’s plenty to be done?

The best volunteer work combines a passion with a need. Since I’ve discovered painting, I’ve wondered how I could combine art with giving. And so, I hope I’m onto something.

I  just finished a series of 16 paintings for the Orange County Historical Museum here in Hillsborough, North Carolina. The museum’s  executive director, Stephanie Pryor, invited me to do the paintings to coordinate with an antique toy exhibit. The exhibit opened April 26 and runs into October. Where’s the giving? I’m donating the paintings.

The paintings are for sale, and the proceeds will support children’s programming at the museum. Large paintings are $65 or two for $100. Small paintings are $40 or two for $70. I’m glad to ship the paintings for an additional $10.

I came up with the idea of toys escaping because maybe, just maybe, toys have dreams and visions too. And maybe, just maybe, they sometimes need a break from the kids who own them. (And I like to think the toys in my paintings come home again.)

Here they are:

Ms. Bear Moves into the Oval Office. 20 by 20.

Snuggle Bunny Escapes the Nursery

Snuggle Bunny Escapes the Nursery.  20 by 16.

Bathub Sailboat Dreams of the Great Lakes

Bathtub Sailboat Dreams of the Great Lakes. 11 by 14.

Paint Set Decorates the Sky on a Gray, Gloomy Day

Watercolor Set Decorates the Sky on a Gray, Gloomy Day. 20 by 16.

Play Dinosaur Morphs into a Real One and Visits the Museum

Play Dinosaur Morphs into a Real One and Visits the Museum. 20 by 20. Sold.

Bunny on Wheels Takes Off

Bunny on Wheels Takes Off. 16 by 20.

Unicorn

Plastic Unicorn Finds a Real Pot of Gold. 14 by 11.

Vintage Sheep and Yoyo Enjoy the Breeze

Vintage Sheep and Yo-yo Enjoy the Breeze. 16 by 20.

Rag Doll

Rag Doll on Her Way to Town for a Store-bought Dress. 12 by 12.

Kaleidoscope

Kaleidoscope Studies Her Own Shapes in the Mirror. 16 by 20.

The Kittens Stand Guard but Where are the Dolls

The Kittens Stand Guard but Where Are the Dolls? 14 by 14.

Play Dough

Play Dough Flowers in a Play Dough Pot Decorate the Palace of a Real Queen. 12 by 12.

The Marbles Have a Field Day

The Marbles Have a Field Day. 20 by 16.

Rockship

Rocket Ship Heads Straight to Mars. 12 by 24. Sold.

Toy Kitchen

Toy Kitchen Bakes a Cake. 14 by 14.

Xylophone

Xylophone Takes a Bow at Symphony Hall. 14 by 11.

 

You can see more of my work on my art website: BarbaraKYounger.com/art

Flowers and Pot

Menopause

Downsizing: What to Do with the Trophies?

Sixth grade. The only year I made straight A’s until my last semester in college.

The year I won two writing contests.

The year I beat everyone in my class, including all the boys, at cross country.

The year I was nominated for Student of the Year and given the trophy above.

My girls have no sentiment whatsoever toward the trophies they earned, some for significant athletic, academic, or musical accomplishments. “I don’t want them,” they each told me. “Please get rid of them.”

The millennials are tough. They don’t like a lot of stuff sitting around.

So what do you do with your children’s trophies if they refuse to take them?

What do you do with your own trophies?

The decision can be even more difficult if you’ve inherited trophies awarded to a parent, and that parent is now gone.

How can you put such mementos in the trash?

If you’re willing to pay for shipping, here are two companies that take trophies, and one that takes medals. Awards that aren’t personalized will be donated to organizations in need, and those that are personalized are broken apart and many of the parts used again.

Trophies

Lamb Awards and Engraving

Awards Mall

Medals:  

Sports Medal Recycling

You can also check with your local awards shop to see if they have a recycling program.

Feeling crafty? Check out some of these ideas on Pinterest:

And look what they’re doing on Etsy. This old guy was re-purposed as a trophy for an Ugliest Christmas Sweater contest:

As for my Student of the Year trophy, I thought I was ready to give it up when I unpacked it a few weeks ago.

But then I set it on my desk bookcase for the blog photo, and it seems to fit. I think I’ll keep it a bit longer. The decision is easier for me since this is the only trophy I ever received. And even though I didn’t end up winning Student of the Year, six grade sure was a good year.

Menopause

Patience: Letting the Paint Dry

I’ve always thought of myself as someone with a good amount of patience. I’d watch Cliff get upset when we hit a stoplight, and I’d think, Why does he care so much?

I’ve waited months for a child to get the hang of potty training. I’ve waited even more months for responses from agents and editors. All the while, I was calm and plugged on with life and its many projects and pleasures and obligations.

But lately? Now that I’m approaching those golden years, not so much.

I’ve noticed it most specifically since I started painting. Acrylics are forgiving, upbeat paints. You can straighten a crooked edge or put two brilliant colors next to each other or add layers to create texture.

But you’ve got to let the paint dry first. And it dries fast.

So why do I continue to mess up a section of a painting by not letting it dry? Is it that hard to turn to another chore or project for a while?

Sometimes, I think it’s my exuberance for the painting. I can’t wait any longer to see how two colors will look together or if I’ve successfully captured the expression on a seagull’s face.

But sometimes, I think it’s my age. I’ve read that women get less patient as the years add on.

Patience has boded me pretty well in life, so I don’t want to lose it now.

I’m getting stricter about letting the paint dry. “No,” I’ll say to myself. “Go do the dishes. Go upload some bathroom doors.”

Time will tell if I am successful.

How about you? Do you find yourself becoming more or less patient as you age? Any tips to share?

Click here for a great Wiki How article link on how to be more patient.

The two paintings in this post were done for an antique toy exhibit that opens April 26 at the Orange Country Historical Museum. Below you’ll see Snuggle Bunny Escapes the Nursery and Watercolor Set Decorates the Sky on a Gray, Gloomy Day.

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