Hot Flashes, Menopause

Beat the Heat in Style with Nano-Ice Cooling Necklace: A Giveaway!

Necklace

A post by Sam White, inventor of the Nano-IceCooling Necklace:

Let me share my short personal story. I spent many years living in India deploying a new cold-storage technology to enable dairy farmers to chill their milk at their villages without diesel generators (you can see more details in this TEDx)

I recently moved back to Boston to get married. My wife started to get hot flashes during pregnancy, so I adapted what I learned in India and invented a freezer-charged Cooling Necklace. It’s a way for you to cool the blood flowing through the arteries of your neck. This provides remarkable cooling effects for people who suffer from menopause, as you can see from the testimonial below.  More importantly, I hired a designer so my wife would feel comfortable wearing a beautiful necklace in public while getting hours of cooling relief. I sincerely hope you do too.  You can see more at www.nano-ice.com

Emily

The Problem with menopause: Hot flashes come and go with menopause. Overheating can cause tremendous discomfort at any moment. The only alternative is a wet absorbent towel or a cumbersome cooling vest.

The beautiful Nano-Ice Cooling Necklace is a fashionable way to provide constant cooling of the blood flowing to the brain via neck arteries. It’s filled with uniquely dense ice that is placed in a freezer and can then provide cooling relief for over 2 hours.

Blue Necklace

Hear how Nano-Ice Cooling Necklace is providing relief from Lea’s hot flashes:

 

Giveaway: Nano-Ice is offering a necklace to one lucky Friend for the Ride winner. For a chance to win, please enter a comment by March 15. Thanks, Nano-Ice!

Questions: Sam would love to hear from you! Please email him: Sam at nano-ice.com

Sam White co-founded Promethean Power Systems in 2007 after winning 2nd place at the MIT$100k. Promethean Power developed a thermal storage technology that enables cold-storage of perishable foods without diesel generators where there is unreliable power.  The thermal storage technology is based on freezing and melting ice efficiently.  Today, for the first time in India’s history, this revolutionary battery is eliminating the need for diesel generators for over 150 villages when chilling milk.  During his journey with Promethean Power, Sam also co-founded Greentown Labs and Nano-Ice Cooling Necklace.

He is the recipient of a few awards such as the GE Ecomagination prize (2010); Boston Globe’s Innovator of the year (2011); NASA’s Launch Energy Innovators Fellows (2012) and World Economic Forum Tech Pioneer (2012).

Sam White

Nano Ice

Hot Flashes, Menopause

BlowMeCool! A Review and Giveaway

snow-woman2

Look at this lovely lady!

She’s so cool, she’s almost blue,

She’s the wind behind the new BlowMeCool mini-fan.

So tiny it fits in your palm (not to mention your purse or pocket), the fan is designed to take the heat out of those hot flashes.

Blow Me Cool

The fan runs for two hours thanks to batteries you recharge with a standard USB.  How convenient is that?

It’s light weight, easy to use, sends out a nice amount of air, and the charge  on mine definitely held a long time.  It’s safe, too, around little fingers if you’re a grandma like I am.

Check out the BlowMeCool website to learn lots more.

And to see the full force of that mighty wind, don’t miss this video, which features dominoes!

Giveway: The way cool and generous folks at BlowMeCool are offering a fan to a lucky Friend for the Ride Reader. To enter the contest, simply leave a comment by August 30 saying that you’d like to be the winner.

Blow Me Cool Fan

Logo

Hot Flashes, Menopause, Menopause Symptoms

The Flower Cooler: A Hot Flash Remedy

Mae Lee in Flower Cooler

A post by florist Mae Lee Brizendine.

Everyone thinks that working in a florist is a heavenly job and it is most of the time.

But, when you work with four cold-natured women and you are going through menopause with all of the hot flashes that ensue, it can be a hellish experience.

On some occasions I have resorted to taking up residence in our flower cooler just to get a little cool air on my other-wise constantly steaming body.

My hot flashes are not exactly “flashes” but rather hot, sweaty, steamy “constants.”

I stay hot all the time while my co-workers shiver and turn up the heat.

I never wear sweaters anymore and the cute scarves everyone is wearing now send me over the edge.  This blazing heat in my body seems like it will go on forever.

However, my doctor tells me that this too shall end.  Ten years seems like a long time to walk through this hellish time in my life.

I guess it could be worse.

I could be freezing like my co-workers and friends, but at least they get to wear those cute scarves and sweaters, while I chill out in the cooler in my short sleeve cotton shirt.

So, the next time you’re thinking how much fun it would be to work in a florist, consider the flower cooler as a perk, if you’re going through menopause.

Flowers

Mae Lee Brizendine is a florist at the Flower Patch in Hillsborough, North Carolina.  Her husband Bob is the pastor of Hillsborough Presbyterian Church. They make a great team, especially for weddings and funerals!

Bob and Mae Lee Brizendine

Hot Flashes, Menopause

Hot Flashes! Some Tips

 Some hot flash tips sent to you from health writer Arianna Solimene:

With the decline of estrogen levels in the body and the onset of menopause, the always-dreaded hot flash effects women of all ages. While hot flashes aren’t completely preventable, there are some steps you can take to manage the overwhelming symptoms.

Step 1

The first step to preventing hot flashes is avoiding tobacco and heavy alcohol consumption. While not a direct cause, both are known to trigger hot flashes in women. Other things to avoid include stress, caffeine, spicy foods, and heat. Because triggers for hot flashes are different for every woman, it’s important to observe and recognize what brings on hot flashes for you.

Step 2

The next step is easier said than done. Relax. More times than not, anxiety and stress can worsen hot flashes. It is important to focus on breathing or meditation to practice relaxation techniques.

More tips for preventing hot flashes

Other ways to prevent hot flashes include exercise, eating well and staying cool. Often, sudden changes in body temperature can trigger a hot flash. Common techniques for staying cool are wearing layers so that you can peel them off, freezing wash clothes so you can place them around your neck, or sleeping in a cool environment at night.

While hot flashes are a normal symptom of menopause and are not a medical problem, some women find them so uncomfortable that they choose to seek medical treatment. This often includes hormone treatments, medications, acupuncture and more.

Although the annoyance of hot flashes is not completely preventable, it’s important to take these steps to manage the symptoms. By living a stress free and healthy lifestyle, you will able to manage & hopefully avoid regular hot flashes.

Arianna Solimene is a staff writer for NorthShore, an integrated health system with dedicated medical offices and hospitals in Chicago. The core mission of NorthShore University HealthSystem is to preserve and improve human life. Visit NorthShore today for personalized wellness services today.

Top Photo: Thanks to the kind shopkeeper at the North Carolina State Fair who let me flash a picture of her hot flash magnet!

Photo Below:  Here’s writer Arianna, with miles to go before the Great Pause!

 

Hot Flashes, Menopause, Menopause Symptoms, Mood

From the Muck of Menopause

Menopause is mucky. Periods so weird they would scare a lady swamp monster.  Breasts that feel like water balloons ready to pop.   Sleep?  In a bed all night long?  Impossible!

The emotional stuff is even more mucky.  Muck . Muck.  Muck.

When I walk on the marsh boardwalk at Bald Head Island, I get really close to the muck.  The muddy swampy squishy kind of  muck.  I like to lean down and study it.

Then I look up again and see the expanse of marsh in front of me.  What beautiful grasses rise from the muck!

I’m not as lovely as the  marsh, and  I’m certainly not that fresh and green, but from the muck of menopause grows me.

And from the muck of menopause grows you.  Wiser.  Tougher.   Braver.  Smarter.  And even though my kids (or yours) might not agree, we’re cooler too in our own way, despite any hot flashes.

When my daughter Laura was in first grade, she loved a book in which the barnyard critters proclaim, “O lovely mud!”

I won’t go so far as to say, “O lovely menopausal muck,” but I take heart when I think about the green swaying grasses of the marsh.

Aging, Hot Flashes, Menopause

Menopause the Musical

I just saw Menopause the Musical.  What fun!  The show is witty, insightful, clever, and well-staged.  Although the script is somewhat lacking in plot, the cast of characters is oh so darling and spunky.  The playbill lists them as a professional woman, a soap star, an earth mother, and an Iowa housewife.  The actresses who portrayed them did wonderful jobs.

And could they sing!  The songs move so fast, it’s hard to catch all the lyrics  but no matter as any sixties girl will love songs about the Great Change set to olden goldies like “Good Vibrations,” “Don’t Make Me Over,” “Puff the Magic Dragon,” and “Don’t Say Nothin Bad About My Baby” (changed to”Don’t Say Nothin Bad about My Body.”)

Menopause the Musical touches on so many aspects of menopause that the audience hooted and clapped through most of the show.  I was surprised there was no mention of periods and the end of  periods (and their sometimes reappearance after a few months).

What was as much fun as the show itself was realizing I have a husband brave enough to go.  When the usher seated us, she said to Cliff, “Do you feel intimidated?” (I counted about ten men in the audience.)  Happily, he answered, “No.”  I suppose if you sweat through menopause with a real live woman, it can only make you so nervous watching stage women acting, dancing, and belting it out.

So do see Menopause the Musical if it comes to your area.  Send in your thoughts, those of you who have seen it.  To add to the girly atmosphere, the show is set at Bloomies!

Hot Flashes, Menopause, Menopause Symptoms, Perimenopause, Periods

Guest Post: The Early Bird

A guest post from my good friend Edna Brown:

On the playground with kids during my fifth grade summer was not the ideal time to “become a lady” as grandma would say. I remember hurting in my mid-section for no reason at all. I did not recall falling or being hit in the stomach or eating anything that would have made me sick. I was confused and in agony.

I was still trying to play a game of tag football with my cousins and her friends at my aunt’s house. I was pushed down and tackled and I felt something that was unusual.

I got up and ran inside to have my aunt check me over.  She told me to go into the bathroom and she would be right in to see what was wrong. I went into the bathroom and almost fainted. I thought that the world had ended and my Tomboy Days were long gone. She was shocked as well but she tried to keep me calm as she explained to me what was going on with my body.  She fixed me up and gave me the “Talk”.

She called my mother – her sister, and we all cried. I thought it was too early to deal with such a thing, and my aunt could not explain why this was an issue for me at the age of eleven. She taught me all about the pads and hiding them from the boys. The purse came into my life. What a drag!

I went from competing with the guys to worrying about where I could sit my purse where they could not discover the new “issue” in my life. I started sulking and lying around the house because my life had changed so drastically. I started to have to physicals which included pap smears and other female related gynecological procedures.

My first few menstrual cycles were the classical four to five days with a light flow, so it was not a lot to manage compared to some of the other girls that I witnessed whose lives came to a screeching halt during their time of the month.

The older I got, the skipping or missed menstrual periods started. I would miss a month or two and have a cycle, miss a month or two. I questioned the doctors about this, and they said that it was normal for some teens. They suggested that I go on birth control pills to regulate my cycle.

This worked for years as far as making my cycle predictable; when I got to the different color pills it was like clockwork.  When I entered my twenties and got married at the age of twenty-two, the skipping started again and this was while I was taking the pills.

Back to the doctors with more questions, they suggested that I use a different dosage and prescribed  contraceptives with a stronger dose. Those pills were the devil in disguise! My cycle became more uncontrollable. I stopped taking them altogether .By the time I reached my thirties, I experienced menstrual periods only a few times a year. I asked my gynecologist if I was going through the change early, and she laughed at me.

I had started experiencing hot flashes after I drank or ate anything sweet. Sugar seems to make a personal sauna moment for me. Each time I asked a doctor about this, there were no answers and always an offer of more contraceptives. One doctor did finally say that the hot flashes and night sweats happens when the level of estrogen decreases and the body temperature rises, which meant menopause to me.

Now that I am in my forties, no children, and hot flashes galore, it is clear to me that I understood my body better than the doctors did. I rarely see a menstrual period, but I am always prepared for one just in case it happens.  Since I started this rollercoaster early, maybe I will get off of it early.  Then I can help others who have questions about the rollercoaster ride of their lives.

Edna Brown works her job as an Academic Success Center/ Academic Computing Support Technician at Piedmont Community College.  She is also enrolled at East Carolina University as an Industrial Technology student studying for her BA degree. She is married, and she loves to travel with her husband any time that they get a chance to get away. Edna also loves reading and exploring new adventures.
P.S from Barbara:  Edna and I work together at Piedmont Community College, and she’s a gem of gems, hormones and all!  Join the discussion!  Post your early bird or any kind of period or menopause woes by clicking “Comments” below.  Thanks!