SYLK: A Giveaway!

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The world is abundant in enticing fruits, but the kiwi is at the top of my list. And so I was pleased when  SYLK offered Friend for the Ride a generous giveaway. Thanks, SYLK!

  • SYLK is the only all-natural moisturizing lubricant made from New Zealand kiwifruit vine extract. What is so special about this proprietary ingredient is that the kiwi vine extract is composed of polysaccharides, which gives SYLK its film-like consistency, very similar in texture to the body’s natural lubrication, without being sticky.
  • Moreover, the kiwi vine extract mirrors vaginal pH. SYLK is pH balanced so it will not upset the delicate pH balance of the vagina. This is particularly important because an imbalance in vaginal pH can cause irritation and infections such as bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections.
  • The proprietary kiwi vine extraction process is also bio-sustainable. The kiwifruits are harvested from the vine, and the vines are usually disposed of. However, SYLK uses the kiwi vine extract as the differentiating ingredient in its moisturizing personal lubricant.After that, the remnants are used back in the orchards as mulch.

Vaginal dryness is not uncommon. In the United States, 64 million women are of menopausal age, in which half experience vaginal dryness. Moreover, there are over 300 medications that can cause vaginal dryness along with numerous medical and life conditions such as the postpartum period, diabetes, auto immune diseases, etc. Adding a moisturizing lubricant can increase comfort daily and for intimacy. Even if vaginal dryness is not a factor, 74% of Americans consider lubricants as a sexual enhancer, according to Durex Global Sex Survey.

Click here to learn more about SYLK.

Giveaway: SYLK will ship a tube of their lubricant to three lucky Friend for the Ride readers. For a chance to win, enter a comment below. If you’re feeling shy, email me. My address is at the right. Contest ends on July 10.

The Deepest Acceptance: A Book Giveaway

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When the publishers of Jeff Foster’s book, The Deepest Acceptance, offered to send me a copy, I said yes right away. I love self-help, especially  books that deal with personal growth and empowerment. When you look at Jeff’s picture, you wonder how someone that young can spread such sensible yet almost mystical wisdom, especially when it comes to relationships and conflict. After all, I like to think that only menopausal women have that sort of knowledge. But not true, Thanks, Jeff!

Here are two passages I underlined from the book:

But really, it’s the most beautiful thing in the world to realize that nobody can be who you need or want them to be for you. Nobody has the power to complete you. Nobody can do that for you. Nobody can be that for you.

And

When you really listen to someone, when you really listen to their perspective, their viewpoint, their expression of their experience of life, their story about what they have noticed in their world, you can always find some truth in what they are saying, however challenging, confronting, strange, extreme, and absurd their views seem at first.

Here’s a description The Deepest Acceptance from the publisher:

How can we bring an effortless yes to this moment? How do we stop running from ‘the mess of life’—our predicaments, our frustrations, and even our search for liberation—and start flowing with all of it?

Existence is rich with mystery and wonder, and sometimes, without warning, light can shine through the cracks in the separate self. For a few brief moments, there is the cosmic suggestion that life is somehow infinitely more than what it appears to be. The most ordinary of things can easily turn extraordinary, making us wonder if, perhaps, the extraordinary is hidden in the ordinary always, just waiting to be discovered.

The Deepest Acceptance: Radical Awakening in Ordinary Life, originally published in hardcover in 2012, explores the possibility of discovering that wholeness right now—not next year, not tomorrow, not “one day,” but right now, in the midst of present experience, in the midst of whatever is happening, even if what’s happening is discomfort and pain and a longing to be free.

Jeff Foster invites readers to consider who they really are: beyond who they think they are, beyond who they’ve been taught they are, beyond their story about who they are, beyond all their concepts and images of identity.

And it’s about discovering the ways in which, in forgetting who we are, in our attempts to build and hold up what basically amounts to a false, thought-constructed image of ourselves, we go to war with present experience, with each other, with the planet.

With a warm, thoughtful, and humorous candor, The Deepest Acceptance invites us to discover the ocean of who we are: an awareness that has already allowed every wave of emotion and experience to arrive.

How can we bring an effortless “yes” to this moment? How do we stop running from ‘the mess of life’—our predicaments, our frustrations, and even our search for liberation—and start flowing with all of it? The answers to these question are at the heart of Jeff’s book.

Existence is rich with mystery and wonder, and sometimes, without warning, light can shine through the cracks in the separate self. For a few brief moments, there is the cosmic suggestion that life is somehow infinitely more than what it appears to be. The most ordinary of things can easily turn extraordinary, making us wonder if, perhaps, the extraordinary is hidden in the ordinary always, just waiting to be discovered.

The Deepest Acceptance explores the possibility of discovering that wholeness right now—not next year, not tomorrow, not “one day,” but right now, in the midst of present experience, in the midst of whatever is happening, even if what’s happening is discomfort and pain and a longing to be free.

Giveaway: The publishers of The Deepest Acceptance: Radical Awakening in Ordinary Life are offing a copy to one lucky Friend for the Ride winner. For a chance to win, please enter a comment by July 1. Thanks!

Jeff Foster shares from his own awakened experience a way out of seeking fulfillment in the future and into acceptance of the present moment. The author of The Way of Rest, he studied astrophysics at Cambridge University and now lives near Brighton, England. For more information, visit lifewithoutacentre.com.

The Bidet! Yes or No?

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Cliff and I just returned from a bucket list trip to Italy. More reports (and some great ladies room doors) to come, but today I want to talk about the bidet.

I first saw a bidet when I went to France in high school. My friends and I were intrigued with this apparatus, but I doubt if any of us used it.

Forty some years later, I’m encountering bidets again. Do I use a bidet when I find one? Hmm. That question makes me feel a bit shy…

Bathroom

I can tell you that bidets are great for doing laundry. The stopper in our sink in Cinque Terre didn’t work right. The bidet!

But then I thought, Cliff is going to come in here and see me washing clothes in the bidet and freak. So I washed them fast! Worked like a charm.

I also experimented with using the bidet to shave my legs. Great for the bottom of the leg. Involves a lot of splashing when you get to the top.

I even ran into a bidet in a few restaurant bathrooms, and I found these handheld bidets next to toilets in some other restaurants.

The showers in Italy often include a handheld bidet sprayer. We had one in Rome, but the shower was so complicated, with water jets firing every which way, that I can’t imagine adding this to the mix. I experienced a claustrophobia attack in this shower brought on by its small size and the steam. I had to open the doors mid-shower and stick my head out to get some air.

Cliff announced in Rome, “That bidet looks so clean, I could eat dinner off of it.” So now I don’t mind if he reads this and learns I washed his clothes in one (which was equally shiny).

We’re at the end of the post, and I still haven’t been gutsy enough to tell you if I used the bidets in these photos.

I will tell you that the linen towels, hung over many bidets, while elegant, sure lack absorbency.

And if I were designing a bathroom, I just might put in a bidet.

What about you? Opinions on the bidet? Do be brave and tell!


Here’s a convincing and fun read on why Americans should use bidets.

Here’s a Wiki guide on how to use a bidet.

And here’s a Wikipedia article that includes the history of the bidet and plenty of other tidbits.

Grandma Update: The Cousins Meet

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In March, we were all invited to the home of Laura’s in-laws.  At the family gathering, my grandson Mazen would meet my granddaughter Emerson for the first time. Talk about a grandma who was pumped!

“All I want for Mother’s Day,” I told daughter Kath earlier that week, “is for you to take a really good photo of Emmie sitting in Maze’s lap.”

“Okay,” she said.

“And I want a print. Something I can put on the refrigerator.”

“Sure.”

Beyond the endearing photo we would capture, I pictured another scene over and over. I would hold Emmie while Mazen made silly faces and rattled colorful toys. Surely Emmie would let out her glorious laugh as she watched the shenanigans of her cousin.

When we got there, Maze took one look at Emmie. A quick look. “Maze,” I said. “Come meet your cousin.”

“She drools,” he announced. “I don’t like drool.”

And he never got close. Not once.

The next day he said to me, “It’s not that I don’t love Emerson, Grammie. I just don’t like drool.”

And there you have it.

From the mouths of babes…comes drool.

From the mouths of four-year-olds, comes some very deep thinking. You can love the person, but you don’t have to love the behavior.

Photo: Daughter Laura holds her baby, Emerson, who looks quite ready to play with her cousin. And yes, that dark pink spot on her shirt is the dreaded drool. Daughter Kath has her arms around her son Mazen.