Grandchildren, Grandmother, Grandparents, Menopause

Grandma Update: Space Age Foods!

Modern Foods

Modern baby raising techniques fascinate this grandma.

Note the space age foods above.

Jane Jetson might have served these shiny pouches to Daughter Judy and Son Elroy when they were tiny tots.

Jane Jetson

No glass to break!

Which brings back the beach trip when Laura Younger, age 18 months, dropped a jar off the balcony of our rental condo in the Outer Banks.

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Said jar shattered on the pool area below.

Cliff spent a good vacation hour picking up tiny shards of glass.

He’s still recovering. That’s why he hasn’t taken me swimming in Mykonos yet, as Laura just got to do on her honeymoon.

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Back to baby food.

No breakage with these pouches. Parents can feed baby from the pouch, and in time, baby can hold it.

How easy and safe is that?

I have split seconds when I declare,  “Not fair!  We didn’t have those.”

Good grandma egg that I am, I mellow fast.

Three cheers for clever baby world inventions!

And speaking of  a clever baby, look who now eats table food.

Capture

Just like Pebbles Flintstone learned to do in the age of the dinosaurs.

Pebbles

YABADABADOO!

Grandchildren, Grandmother, Grandparents

Rick’s Grandma (and Her White Potato Pudding Recipe!)

Rick's Grandma

When I began reading essays at Piedmont Community College in Yanceyville, North Carolina, I was struck by the happy place that grandparents, especially grandmothers, play in the lives of the students I meet.

Paper after paper recounts a grandma’s love.  Her energy. Her patience. Her whimsy. Her cooking!

So when my daughter Kath announced that my first grandchild was on the way, I began to wonder (and worry) a bit.

What sort of grandma will I be?  Will I earn someday a staring role in an essay?

A few weeks ago, Rick Stone brought in his paper. I’m  a writing tutor. I have the privilege of looking over essays before the instructor does, with his or her grading pen in hand.

Titled “My Adored Grandmother,” Rick’s essay tells of Anna Gertrude Foster, a “short, little woman with intelligent eyes.”  Born in 1923, as the years went by Anna was “blessed with twelve children.”

Rick put down the paper we were studying and spoke: “When Grandma came into the room, even though she had a quiet voice, everyone stopped talking.”

All eyes and ears focused on Anna.

In time, her grandchildren numbered twenty-four, but when you were with Anna, “It was like you were her favorite grandchild. She treated you so special. Her beautiful smile made you feel loved.”

I’ll never be tiny like Rick’s grandma.

I’m far from soft-spoken.

I’ve got a rather crooked smile.

It was like you were her favorite grandchild. She treated you so special.

But that I can try my very best to do.

Even if I have twenty-four.

Guide me, Anna Gertrude Foster!

Photo Above:  Anna in the yard of her home many years ago.

 

Rick's Grandma in Green Top

Anna in later years.

Rick Stone

Rick holding two drafts of his essay.

Anna could cook!  Rick’s favorite dish was her White Potato or Ash Pudding, served for dessert. He brought in a cupful, piping hot, for me to taste. Yum. Potato magic!

White Potato (or Ash) Pudding

3-4 medium potatoes peeled, boiled until done, and mashed

one stick butter or margarine

one 1/4 cups sugar

2 eggs

2 drops of lemon flavor or a teaspoon of lemon juice

1/4 cup milk

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients except the eggs. Beat until smooth.

Beat eggs in a separate bowl. Add to the potato mixture and beat for one minute.

Put into an ovenproof dish and bake for 40-45 minutes or until the pudding is brown on top.

Serve warm.

Store leftover pudding in the refrigerator.

Note: You may need to set your oven on broil after forty minutes to get the pudding to brown.

Thanks to Rick’s mom, Anna Stone, for this recipe, and thanks to Rick for permission to quote from his essay and for the photos.