Menopause

Floss! A TMI Habits Post

I’m on a major kick to break bad habits and add good ones. Read my first post on the topic here.

One vow I’ve made is to spend more time brushing my teeth.

“I read you need to brush for two minutes,” said Cliff a few months ago as he worked away at his own teeth. We have double sinks in the new house. A whole new marriage experience!

So Part One of my tooth habit is to brush longer. I only succeed some, but I am definitely getting there.

And I’ve made a vow to floss more. I use the interdental brushes Those things are fab for teeth gunk.

But my dental hygienist says those little brushes don’t replace flossing. I used to floss about once a week. My teeth are spaced close together in the back. Sometimes the floss would get stuck and then break off, with a tiny piece remaining. I’d always go into a bit of a panic until I got it out.

Then daughter Kath introduced me to Glide.  My flossing world opened up! I love this stuff. It’s like a trip to the spa for my mouth. I’m especially partial to the minted version:

 

James Clear, author of Atomic Habits, writes: “It is crucial to make your habits so easy that you’ll do them when you don’t feel like it.”

This is a pretty basic concept, but it’s helping me as I work to make life changes. Thank you, Glide! You glide right along, never get stuck, and feel gentle on the gums.

What about you? Are there products you’ve discovered that have helped you break a bad habit or add a good one?

More Floss Talk: We learned the hard way that dental floss and toilets do not mix. A big plumbing bill taught us that lesson.

How to Floss: Here’s a lesson from the American Dental Association on how to floss correctly. 

 

 

Menopause

Calling All Menopausal Women

Here’s a fun request from freelance writer Mara Santilli. She’s working on a story for Menopause Awareness Month in September and needs our help. I’m planning to share a bit of my experience with Mara, and I hope you will too. 

Take it way Mara!

I’m Mara Santilli, a freelance writer, and I’m working on a story package on menopause for Menopause Awareness Month in September for The Plum, a new US-based site for women over 40.

We’re looking for women of all ages and backgrounds who are currently in some stage of menopause to share a bit about their experience.

We’ll be including first and last names, a quote, and a photo from each woman. Please reach out to maracsantilli@gmail.com if you’d like to participate!

Menopause

Her Period Days Are Over and Mostly Forgotten

As a younger woman, I imagined feeling daily gratitude once my period days were over. How incredible it would be!

I suffered from many manifestations of PMS that started at mid-cycle. Then the cramps hit. Basically, I had one week a month when my body felt content. Even when Cliff and I argued about this and that, I remember thinking but I suffer so from being a woman. The whole world needs to cut me a million breaks.

So am I now in a state of constant appreciation that I am period-free?

Nope.

Why?

I’m not really sure, but here are two theories:

First off, I’d love to have some of that estrogen back.

Second, menopause is a transition complete with its own problems. It’s not like a fairy suddenly waves her wand and says, “Poof. You’re done!”  As our bodies weather through menopause, I think the other problems can cloud the happy feeling of no more periods.

When I saw the above article in Oprah Magazine, I realized I don’t even think about my period anymore. In fact, it’s not even in my radar that other women are suffering like I once did. I wish all of them well of course. I just forget.

Here’s a post I wrote when the blog was brand new eight years ago about mourning the loss of periods, an emotion that surprised me then.

Am I mourning  the college girl, long gone, who dealt with periods as she juggled research papers, boyfriend, and dorm conversations that ended in happy hysterics?  Am I missing the possibility of one more sweet baby?  Am I grieving for a body that amazed me because it could count the days?  Am I worrying about the body now, which certainly seems less efficient, and the one to come?

The end of periods was very much on my mind eight years ago. It’s not now.

I’m not sure what my point is. Maybe just that life moves on. At best we embrace those changes.

What about you? Do you remember to be thankful your periods are gone? Do you miss them in any way?

And for you young ones, how anxious are you for those days to be over?

Menopause

Arguing. Who’s Done?

 

I want that to be me.

I’m not talking about important moments when you truly need to stand up for yourself.

I’m talking about the dumb stuff. The stuff that doesn’t deeply matter.

Letting even minor arguments go can be a challenge at first, especially when you’re pretty sure you’re right. It can feel like keeping your hands out of the M & M’s bowl. Not easy!

1280px-Plain-M&Ms-Pile

“I know I’m right. I know I’m right. I know I’m right,” your brain chants. But learning to resist can save the moment or save the day or maybe even save the vacation.

Can you do it?

Our spunky interim pastor talked about the best toast given at her wedding. The toaster looked at them both and said, “You can either be right or you can stay married.”

And so perhaps not arguing about the dumb stuff should be a credo for happiness in all relationships. Even with strangers.

It feel so right to give up the need to be right.

What do you say? Are you there yet?

P.S. I lifted the graphic at the top of the post from Tiny Buddha: Simple Wisdom for Complex Lives. This may or may not be a fair use of one of their graphics. If you find this, Tiny Buddha, and want me to take it down, I will. No arguing. Love your site! Facebook wisdom at its best.

Menopause

My Core: Planks!

This February, I noticed I was having a hard time getting up off the kitchen floor. I’d go down on my knees to clean up a spill, and then struggle to get up again. Yikes! Suddenly, I felt eighty.

Enter the issue of strengthening my core. I’ve been avoiding the topic for years. The time had come.

“Planks,” said both of my daughters.

“Planks,” said the trainer at Planet Fitness, my beloved purple gym.

And so I’m in. No need for special clothes or shoes. On Sunday, I even did a plank in my church clothes for a change of pace. I just drop to the floor and start that plank.

There are all sorts of variations and modifications to planks. For starters, this is what I’m doing:

My first goal was to hold the plank for thirty seconds, which I now can do. It may be wishful thinking, but It seems like my stomach is a bit flatter. Hooray for that. It needs it. And I’m already getting up with less of a struggle.

What about you? Anybody else into planks? Any other core exercises that you find easy and efficient? What about you yoga people? Do you feel yoga does wonders for your core?

Photo: I wasn’t wild about posting a photo of me mid-plank. Instead, I put up the sweet rug from my mom. It’s a treasured possession, and it’s my Plank Place although, of course, you can do a plank almost anywhere.

 

Menopause

The Ladies Room Door Art Series: Part Fifty-one

Welcome to another edition of the Ladies Room Door Art series! Sadly, your curator has slipped up on the job. I don’t know where I took the above sign. It’s got an understated elegance about it. I like it!

Karen sent these funky doors from the Boathouse Restaurant in Disney Springs.

 

I found this pleasant sign at Pizza Peels in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Candice sent these lovely wolves from North Carolina State University.

Carol was impressed that even the ladies room is decked out at the Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia. She visited with her granddaughter.

Also from Carol, The Improper Pig in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Take a look at Hers:

And then His:

These are the restroom doors  at the Gatewood House, a new restaurant here in Hillsborough.

Michele sent this spunky saying from the Salt Water Cowboys Restaurant in Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina.

To finish this post with a jolt of color, here’s good ole Dunkin Donuts. I do think they could tidy up the tape mess underneath this bold and happy W.

dunkin

That concludes another edition of our Ladies Room Door Art Series. Do keep Friend for the Ride in mind as you travel this summer. Every pit stop is a ladies room door opportunity waiting to happen. Send all doors to BKYounger@gmail. com. Thanks!

Menopause

Shingles Shot! My Report

The thought of getting shingles terrifies me. My good friend, Lisa, got very sick with the disease a few years ago, and Judith Gray wrote about her shingles experience in a blog post on Friend for the Ride. Read Judith’s account here. 

Yikes! Throw in the facts that one in three people will get shingles, that the risk grows as we age, and that shingles may leave you with postherpetic neuropathy, I say, “NO THANKS!”

Cliff and I got the original vaccine five years ago. Turns out that shot was only about fifty percent effective. When we heard that the new vaccine, Shingrix, is ninety percent effective, we signed up.

The vaccine is hard to come by. We put ourselves on our pharmacy’s list and waited about eight months. Then one night in the middle of dinner, the pharmacy called, telling us we needed to be there within 24 hours. I was ready to jump until I remembered friends telling me the shot made them feel sick.

I had an all-day art workshop three days later. Would I feel well enough? I decided to take my chances since if we didn’t get the shot this time, we were told we’d go to the end of the waiting list.

“Almost everyone reports a pretty sore arm,” the pharmacist told me as she swabbed my own arm an hour later. “Other reactions vary. Some people are so sick they’re on the couch all day. Others feel crumby but manage to carry on with the help of over-the-counter pain reliever.”

So here’s my report for those of you worried about reactions to the shot. I know all experiences are different.

I woke up at one AM, after having the shot at 7:30 PM, with a very sore arm and what felt like a mild flu. I took Tylenol and felt better fast. I’m a poor sleeper to start with though, and I was up four more hours before I finally went back to sleep. I felt really wired.

I spent the next day pretty tired, so it’s hard to know how much of my sluggishness was poor sleep and how much was the shot. I did take a few more doses of Tylenol over the next 24 hours.

Happily, I felt fine by the time I went to my art workshop a few days later. I did a tiny copy of Matisse’s  pink lady:

Matisse

Cliff got the shot the morning after I did and had the same very sore arm. He never felt as sick although he woke up in the middle of the second night feeling slightly feverish. Our sore arms lasted about three days. The arm was only sore to the touch and using that arm was no problem.

So that’s our scoop. Our reactions were not nearly as severe as I thought they might be. We take a second shot two to six months from now.

To learn more about shingles and the new shingles vaccine, read this article on WebMD.